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Posts Tagged "saxophone"

Webster – Auld – Hawkins Sextet session

»Posted by on feb 13, 2011 in Blog, English | Komentáre vypnuté na Webster – Auld – Hawkins Sextet session

Webster – Auld – Hawkins Sextet session

This session, from May 17, 1944 (sometimes falsely put on May 24), unites two disciples of the strong tenor school with their master and teacher, Coleman Hawkins. Ben Webster and Georgie Auld (at that time 35 and 25 years old) both came from the Hawk tradition of tenor playing, with full, fat, rich, robust tones, a lot of vibrato and growl. This is the first time each of these men played with Hawkins and this Apollo session produced an unorthodox front line – trumpet and three tenor saxophones. The accompaniment was provided by Billy Rowland (p), Hy White (g), Israel Crosby (b) and Specs Powell (d), which was at that time the rhythm section of Raymond Scott’s group. As John Chilton writes in his book The Song Of The Hawk: „The session started...

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Coleman Hawkins solo – She’s Funny That Way

»Posted by on nov 3, 2010 in Blog, English | Komentáre vypnuté na Coleman Hawkins solo – She’s Funny That Way

Coleman Hawkins solo – She’s Funny That Way

This recording was made on October 11, 1939. This date should be well known to every jazz fan, as this is the same date, on which Hawk recorded the famous Body And Soul, which laid the fundamentals of  bebop harmonic playing. Having in mind my last transcription of Coleman Hawkins, from 1944, this solo from 1939 is to me clearly showing the way, how Hawk came to utilizing the tritone substitutions in his playing. We can see his use of diminished chord (anticipating dominant F7b9 chord to the tonic Bb major), freely floating from Bb major scale through the diminished chord (mostly descending -> f# eb c a) back to the home Bb major. Changing one tone in the diminished (c to b natural) shows us exactly the way I think Hawk discovered the possible use of tritone...

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Coleman Hawkins – Rainbow Mist – complete solo analysis

»Posted by on sep 17, 2010 in Blog, coleman hawkins, English | 2 komentáre

I have never done any musical analysis before, well, any written analysis. I hope to explain the harmonic and melodic devices used in this solo.At the beginning, a short introduction is appropriate, so who is Coleman Hawkins? Coleman Randolph Hawkins (November 21, 1904 – May 19, 1969) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist, generally recognized as the father of the tenor saxophone, as he was the first person to use this horn as a jazz solo instrument, not just a part of vaudeville performances. Hawkins himself is quoted to say the following: „Some people say there was no jazz tenor before me. All I know is I just had a way of playing and I didn’t think in terms of any other instrument but the tenor.“ This master of improvisation in the...

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Sonny Rollins’ solo on The Eternal Triangle

»Posted by on aug 14, 2010 in Blog, English | 0 comments

This is the complete edition of my marathon transcription of The Eternal Triangle from album Sonny Side Up (1957). This document contains the Rollins’ and Stitt’s solos, as well as their trading of fours and eights. The preview shows first 2 pages of each solo as well as first 2 pages of the trading. To get the full document, visit the link below.Enjoy the playing of these 2 greats of the tenor saxophone at their best! Sonny Rollins, Sonny Stitt – Eternal Triangle COMPLETE with trading! by Martin...

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Sonny Rollins + Sonny Stitt Transcription

»Posted by on aug 13, 2010 in Blog, English | 0 comments

Transcribing (and then of course practicing the solos) is just one of the greatest learning material available. Fortunately, there are many softwares which slow down the track, so everyone is able to get even the smallest nuances in every solo. Even though it is a slow and sometimes painful process, I love how much it helps! Today, I decided to transcribe the legendary recording, called The Eternal Triangle, from Dizzy Gillespie’s album Sonny Side Up (1957), namely the battle of the tenors there – Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt. Each of the players plays his solo, and then they trade fours and then eights. Altogether their playing takes almost 9 minutes, it ends at 8:54. That’s going to be a lot of pages…Wish me luck, it is going to be the...

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